BERTOLODO di GIOVANNI

The Renaissance of Sculpture in Medici Florence

The Frick Collection – New York – December 2019

RODIN: TRUTH, FORM, LIFE.

November 2019 – Fairfield University

Selections from the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Collections

 

Lecture at THE MET

Dr. Barbara Jatta – Director of the Vatican Museums

September 20, 2019

 

Reception at Timothy Cardinal Dolan’s Residence

September 18, 2019

     

Leaders Weekend – Washington DC

September 13, 2019 – September 15, 2019

Leonardo da Vinci’s Saint Jerome

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Exhibition Tour

Tuesday, 27 August 2019

The Metropolitan Museum of Art observed the 500-year anniversary of the death of the great Renaissance master, Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), with its exhibition, “Leonardo da Vinci’s Saint Jerome.”   The painting was lent to The Metropolitan Museum with collegial generosity by The Vatican Museums.

St. Jerome Praying in the Wilderness is one of the six works universally and unquestionably recognized as by the hand of Leonardo.  The painting, begun in 1482 and constantly re-worked by the artist until his death in 1519, is famous for its artistic quality, its representing the epitome of Leonardo’s anatomical studies, and its drama and psychological insight, capturing as it does the painter’s spiritual life during his last decades.

At The MET, the painting was displayed in a gallery by itself, starkly illuminated within an otherwise sober and dark space in order to heighten the picture’s contemplative, spiritual dimension.  The solemn chapel-like setting was intended to heighten the profound contemplative dimension of the painting as well as to evoke the funerals of great Italian artists, which typically featured one of the artist’s works as part of the funerary display.

On 27 August 2019, Dr. Carmen Bambach, Curator of Drawings and Prints at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and curator of the exhibition, conducted a guided tour of the painting for a group of 45 NY Chapter Board Members, NY Chapter Members, and friends.  Drawing on her immensely rich knowledge acquired over a 24 year period during which she penned the just published 4-volume work, Leonardo da Vinci Rediscovered, Dr. Bambach presented an elucidating and engaging guided tour of the painting and its significance in Leonardo’s oeuvre.

Leonardo da Vinci’s Saint Jerome Praying in the Wilderness

A Lecture by Carmen Bambach, Ph.D.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

19 July 2019

The Metropolitan Museum of Art observed the 500-year anniversary of the death of the great Renaissance master, Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), with its exhibition, “Leonardo da Vinci’s Saint Jerome.”  The painting was lent to The Metropolitan Museum with collegial generosity by The Vatican Museums.

Dr. Bambach presented an elucidating and engaging lecture on Leonardo da Vinci and the place of Saint Jerome Praying in the Wilderness in his oeuvre.  Leonardo was a seminal figure in the Renaissance, acclaimed as much as an engineer and scientist as he was a painter.  Famous for his iconic masterpieces such as The Adoration of the Magi, the two versions of The Madonna of the Rocks, and of course Mona Lisa, Leonardo’s fame connected to Saint Jerome Praying in the Wilderness certainly also is a function of the painting’s artistic quality, universally recognized as one of six works unquestionably by the hand of the master.  Yet there are factors that lend the master’s Saint Jerome a certain degree of singularity.  The painting, still unfinished, was worked and re-worked by Leonardo for the last 35-40 years of his life and thus it has come to be appreciated as the epitome of Leonardo’s ongoing research into human anatomy.   In addition, though the subject of Saint Jerome living as a hermit in the wilderness was common in the Renaissance, Leonardo’s Saint Jerome stands alone; the saint is depicted in the throes of intimate, penitential reverie as he gazes upon a crucifix at the moment he is about to commit an act of physical self-abnegation.  Charged as it is with such drama and psychological insight, the painting is a portrait of the saint as much as it is a portrait of Leonardo’s spiritual life during those last decades when the painter carried the work with him wherever he went.

Dr. Carmen Bambach, Curator of Drawings and Prints at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, is curator of the exhibition.  She is the author of the recently published 4-volume work, Leonardo da Vinci Rediscovered, the fruit of 24 years of research and writing.  She stands as the doyenne of Leonardo studies in the world today.

In Progress: Bramante Courtyard Restoration – See Video Link

 

The New York Chapter just completed the funding of a $150,000 Chapter grant towards the Bramante Courtyard restoration project.  We invite you to take advantage of multiple gifting opportunities on individual or corporate levels so that you too can become a part of this amazing work.  Four of our board members have stepped up and made contributions totaling $300,000 towards the Bramante Courtyard restoration.  We hope this will inspire you to realize how critical it is to support the restoration of the works at the Vatican Museums.  Please visit the “CONTACT US” page for more details.

Reception at Papal Residence 72nd St., NY

The Charterhouse of Bruges: Jan van Eyck, Petrus Christus, and Jan Vos

The Frick Collection Exhibition Tour

Friday, 16 November 2018

The Frick’s Virgin and Child with St. Barbara, St. Elizabeth, and Jan Vos, by Jan van Eyck and workshop, and The Virgin and Child with St. Barbara and Jan Vos, by Petrus Christus, now in the Gemaeldegalerie, Berlin, were commissioned by Jan Vos in the 1440s during his tenure as prior of the Carthusian monastery (or  charterhouse) of Bruges.  This exhibition brings together these two masterpieces of early Netherlandish painting for only the second time in their history.

The two panels are presented with Carthusian objects that place them in their rich monastic context, offering a glimpse into the visual environment of the charterhouse and highlighting the role that images played in shaping devotional life and funerary practices during the late Middle Ages.

The exhibition is curated by Emma Capron, a doctoral candidate at The Courtauld Institute of Art, London, and 2016-18 Anne L. Poulet Curatorial Fellow at The Frick Collection.  Ms. Capron led the scholarly and engaging tour of the exhibition for Patrons and friends.

Frick Tour IMAGE

Photo Credit:

Jan van Eyck and Workshop

The Virgin and Child with St. Barbara, St. Elizabeth, and Jan Vos, circa 1441-43

Oil on Panel

8.75 in x  24.25 in

The Frick Collection, New York