“Two Millennia of Beauty & Devotion” VIRTUAL LECTURE SERIES

Join the Patrons with their families and friends in a four-part lecture series with Fr. Michael Collins, tracing the development of sacred art in the Holy City. During these virtual tours, we descend to the underground chambers of the Roman catacombs, visit the archaeological sites underneath St. Peter’s Basilica, and enter the Apostolic Palace itself.

Each episode will start at 1PM Pacific Standard Time (4PM EST).

June 6: The Art of the Catacombs    Watch here
June 13: The Tomb of Peter       Watch Here
June20: St. Peter’s Basilica         Watch Here
June 27: The Banker’s Son & The Most Unfortunate Pope   Watch Here

Click Here to Register

Donate

“Raphael and His World” Virtual Lecture Series

A 4-week virtual lecture series by renowned art historian and well-known Patrons tour guide, Prof. Elizabeth Lev! We are excited to bring the Vatican Museums to our Patrons, their families, and friends during this time!

Each episode will start at 4PM Eastern Standard Time and will last one hour in duration.

“Raphael and His World” Lecture Series Themes:

April 25: The Elusive Leonardo              Watch Here
May 2: The Might of Michelangelo       Watch Here
May 9: Clash of the Titans                      Watch Here
May 16: Raphael Triumphans, Raphael Moriens     Watch Here

RAPHAEL AND HIS WORLD.pdf

Click here to register

Donate

Gothic Spirit Exhibit at NY Chelsea’s Luhring Augustine Gallery

New York – February 2020

BERTOLODO di GIOVANNI

The Renaissance of Sculpture in Medici Florence

The Frick Collection – New York – December 2019

RODIN: TRUTH, FORM, LIFE.

November 2019 – Fairfield University

Selections from the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Collections

 

Lecture at THE MET

Dr. Barbara Jatta – Director of the Vatican Museums

September 20, 2019

 

Reception at Timothy Cardinal Dolan’s Residence

September 18, 2019

     

Leaders Weekend – Washington DC

September 13, 2019 – September 15, 2019

Leonardo da Vinci’s Saint Jerome

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Exhibition Tour

Tuesday, 27 August 2019

The Metropolitan Museum of Art observed the 500-year anniversary of the death of the great Renaissance master, Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), with its exhibition, “Leonardo da Vinci’s Saint Jerome.”   The painting was lent to The Metropolitan Museum with collegial generosity by The Vatican Museums.

St. Jerome Praying in the Wilderness is one of the six works universally and unquestionably recognized as by the hand of Leonardo.  The painting, begun in 1482 and constantly re-worked by the artist until his death in 1519, is famous for its artistic quality, its representing the epitome of Leonardo’s anatomical studies, and its drama and psychological insight, capturing as it does the painter’s spiritual life during his last decades.

At The MET, the painting was displayed in a gallery by itself, starkly illuminated within an otherwise sober and dark space in order to heighten the picture’s contemplative, spiritual dimension.  The solemn chapel-like setting was intended to heighten the profound contemplative dimension of the painting as well as to evoke the funerals of great Italian artists, which typically featured one of the artist’s works as part of the funerary display.

On 27 August 2019, Dr. Carmen Bambach, Curator of Drawings and Prints at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and curator of the exhibition, conducted a guided tour of the painting for a group of 45 NY Chapter Board Members, NY Chapter Members, and friends.  Drawing on her immensely rich knowledge acquired over a 24 year period during which she penned the just published 4-volume work, Leonardo da Vinci Rediscovered, Dr. Bambach presented an elucidating and engaging guided tour of the painting and its significance in Leonardo’s oeuvre.

Leonardo da Vinci’s Saint Jerome Praying in the Wilderness

A Lecture by Carmen Bambach, Ph.D.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

19 July 2019

The Metropolitan Museum of Art observed the 500-year anniversary of the death of the great Renaissance master, Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), with its exhibition, “Leonardo da Vinci’s Saint Jerome.”  The painting was lent to The Metropolitan Museum with collegial generosity by The Vatican Museums.

Dr. Bambach presented an elucidating and engaging lecture on Leonardo da Vinci and the place of Saint Jerome Praying in the Wilderness in his oeuvre.  Leonardo was a seminal figure in the Renaissance, acclaimed as much as an engineer and scientist as he was a painter.  Famous for his iconic masterpieces such as The Adoration of the Magi, the two versions of The Madonna of the Rocks, and of course Mona Lisa, Leonardo’s fame connected to Saint Jerome Praying in the Wilderness certainly also is a function of the painting’s artistic quality, universally recognized as one of six works unquestionably by the hand of the master.  Yet there are factors that lend the master’s Saint Jerome a certain degree of singularity.  The painting, still unfinished, was worked and re-worked by Leonardo for the last 35-40 years of his life and thus it has come to be appreciated as the epitome of Leonardo’s ongoing research into human anatomy.   In addition, though the subject of Saint Jerome living as a hermit in the wilderness was common in the Renaissance, Leonardo’s Saint Jerome stands alone; the saint is depicted in the throes of intimate, penitential reverie as he gazes upon a crucifix at the moment he is about to commit an act of physical self-abnegation.  Charged as it is with such drama and psychological insight, the painting is a portrait of the saint as much as it is a portrait of Leonardo’s spiritual life during those last decades when the painter carried the work with him wherever he went.

Dr. Carmen Bambach, Curator of Drawings and Prints at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, is curator of the exhibition.  She is the author of the recently published 4-volume work, Leonardo da Vinci Rediscovered, the fruit of 24 years of research and writing.  She stands as the doyenne of Leonardo studies in the world today.